Gus Kenworthy breaks thumb, relieved he doesn’t have to shake Mike Pence’s hand

Gus Kenworthy

Gus Kenworthy’s Winter Olympics medal hopes are in danger as he has broken his thumb.

The 2014 Olympic silver medalist in freestyle slopestyle skiing has said he broke the bone while practicing on the course in PyeongChang.

But the US athlete will not allow a small thing like a broken thumb to stop him from competing.

Kenworthy has confirmed he will take part in Sunday’s qualifying round for men’s slopstyle on Sunday (18 February).

Gus Kenworthy breaks thumb, will still compete

‘Broke my thumb yesterday in practice,’ he tweeted.

‘It won’t stop me from competing (obvi) but it does prevent me from shaking Pence’s hand so… Silver linings!

‘Will be giving my teammates (and literally everyone else) an enthusiastic “thumbs up!” of encouragement the rest of the trip.’

Broken thumbs might be painful, but they’re not an injury that can take a skier out of a major competition.

Canadian halfpipe skier Cassie Sharpe broke her thumb while competing in an X Games final. To modify, she taped her pole to her hand for the rest of the contest.

She won the bronze medal with one of those runs that came after the broken thumb.

So it is hoped Kenworthy will still be able to follow his success in Sochi.

Following up success in Sochi

Gus Kenworthy will fly the rainbow flag in Korea at the Winter Olympics

Gus Kenworthy will fly the rainbow flag in Korea at the Winter Olympics

While this may be Gus Kenworthy’s second Olympics, it is his first as being an openly gay athlete.

Winning a silver medal in Sochi, he said he felt ‘horrible’ about being closeted at the Russian Games.

He came out in 2015, and has become a high profile star.

‘Very proud to be heading to Korea on behalf of my family, my hometown, the USA and the LGBTQ community!!! Woohoo!!!’ he said.

He has already confirmed that he will not accept a White House invitation from Donald Trump.

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2018 Olympics will have a record 13 out LGBTQ athletes

List includes the first out male Winter Olympians.

There will be a record 13 publicly out LGBTQ athletes at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, including out men for the first time.

The number of out Olympians tops the seven from the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi. In contrast, there were 56 out Olympians at the much larger Summer Olympics in 2016.

This list includes athletes who are open publicly about their orientation (there has never been an openly transgender Olympic athlete), meaning they have discussed it at some point publicly. We are aware there are other LGBT Winter Olympians who are out within their sport or team, but they have chosen not to discuss it publicly; these athletes are not on this list.

Often when we do this list, readers will alert us to someone we missed and we very much appreciate the tips. Send us any names we missed, along with relevant links, to: [email protected]

2018 Out Winter Olympians

Emilia Andersson Ramboldt (Sweden, ice hockey): A two-time Olympian, Andersson Ramboldt is a defender on Sweden’s ice hockey team and attended Minnesota State University. She married her wife, Anna Ramboldt, in 2015.
Social media: Instagram, Twitter.

Belle Brockhoff (Australia, snowboarding): Brockhoff was selected to Australia’s Winter Olympics team just two months after suffering a bad knee injury, snowboarder Belle. Her participation is subject to her being medically clear. Brockhoff came out publicly as gay in 2013 prior to the 2014 Sochi Games as a protest against anti-LGBT laws that were passed in Russia. Before those Games she said wanted to “rip on the ass” of Russian President Vladimir Putin, who pushed the laws.
Social media: Instagram, Twitter

Brittany Bowe (U.S., speedskating): Bowe is a former inline skater who has excelled on the ice, setting world records and winning medals. She competed in Sochi in 2014 but did not medal. An NBC Olympics profile noted that Bowe is dating Dutch speedskater Manon Kamminga. “It’s nice being with somebody that has the same passion, same drive, same goals,” Bowe said. “It’s obviously difficult living on different sides of the world. But we’re both focused on our goal.”
Social media: Instagram, Twitter, Facebook.

Jorik Hendrickx (Belgium, figure skating): Hendrickx is a two-time Belgian national champion who will be competing in his second Olympics. He came out publicly last month in an interview.
Social media: Instagram, Twitter, Facebook

Daniela Iraschko-Stolz (Austria, ski jumping): This is the second Olympics for Iraschko-Stolz, who won a silver medal in Sochi. She is married.
Social media: Instagram

Barbara Jezeršek (Australia, cross country skiing): This is the second Olympics for Jezeršek, who competed for Slovenia in Sochi. “I think it’s everyone’s personal decision to come out as LGBT athletes,” she told Outsports. “In some sports it’s still a taboo, so I totally understand their decision and support that. It’s hard no matter that we live now in a more open world. On the end of a day it’s all about sport and we do it with biggest passion. But if we can share it with our partners it’s even better.
Social media: Instagram, Twitter.

Gus Kenworthy (U.S., slopestyle free skiing): Easily the most publicized LGBT athlete of the Olympics, Kenworthy (a 2014 silver medalist) is a strong medal contender. He has gotten numerous endorsements and is one of NBC’s faces of the Games.
Social media: Instagram, Twitter

Cheryl Maas (Netherlands, snowboarding): This is the third Olympics for Maas and she is the first Dutch athlete to medal at the XGames. In an interview for Outsports with journalist Gretchen Pleshaw, she talked about falling in love. She is married to former snowboarder Stine Brun Kjeldaas of Norway. The couple have two daughters, Lara and Mila
Social media: Instagram, Twitter

Simona Meiler (Switzerland, snowboarding): Meiler will be representing Switzerland in her third Olympics. She said that being openly gay has allowed her to compete without added stress. “[Athletes] have to be ready to give everything and perform wholeheartedly, and in my eyes that’s only possible if they can accept and express their sexuality,” she said. “That doesn’t mean they have to blare out that they are gay. But it definitely helps if an athlete’s closer environment is supportive and encouraging.”
Social media: Instagram

Sarka Pancochova (Czech Republic, snowboarding): This is the third Olympics for Pancochova and her first as an openly LGBT athlete. In an interview for Outsports with journalist Gretchen Pleshaw, she talked about not having to hide any more and how “stoked” she is to be out.
Social media: Instagram

Eric Radford (Canada, pairs figure skating): This is the second Olympics for Radford, who has won world titles with skating partner Meagan Duhamel, but the first since coming out openly. In his coming out interview with Outsports, he highlighted one benefit of being a male pairs skater who is gay. “A lot of pairs end up dating one another,” Radford said. “It can become risky because your on-ice training can be affected by your off-ice relationship. If you have a fight at home, it makes that training difficult. I used to joke around that I’m the ultimate pair-boy. I never had to worry about developing an off-ice relationship.” Radford is engaged to be married.
Social media: Instagram, Twitter

Adam Rippon (U.S., figure skating): The “old man” of the U.S. skating team at 28, Rippon jokes that he is proud of his “sons” Nathan Chen (18) and Vincent Zhou (17). Rippon came out in 2015 and proudly wears the banner of being the first publicly gay figure skater. His social media is acerbic and witty and must-follow.
Social media: Instagram, Twitter

Ireen Wüst (Netherland, speed skating): Wüst is speed skating royalty with gold medals in the 3,000 meters and team pursuit in Sochi, along with three silvers. She also won gold in 2006 and 2010. She is openly bisexual and married her female partner Letitia de Jong in 2017.
Social media: Instagram

A huge thanks to LGBT Olympic historian Tony Scupham-Bilton who helped us compile this list. His blog, The Queerstory Files, is a compilation of LGBT history.

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Concern for LGBTQ soccer fans 2018 at the World Cup!

Travel advisories for American soccer tourists on the State Department website warn of Russia’s 2013 laws against “gay propaganda,” which have spiked homophobic attacks, arrests, and killings over the past Continue Reading

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6 Ways to Meet Gay Men that Don’t Require Apps

Over the past 10 years I’ve been in a number of relationships, each of which began in a unique way. From the antiquated approach of creepily sending a friend request on Facebook to someone I didn’t know personally, to pursuing dates with what should have just been a Grindr hookup, I have met gay guys using a handful of methods, some of which have proven to yield better long-term outcomes than others.

Oddly enough, my current partner and I actually met at an afterhours party amidst hundreds of sweaty bodies, a relentless thumping bassline, and impressive strobe lights. Luckily for us, we quickly learned that our common interests span far beyond the occasional circuit party. While this situation is probably atypical given the circumstance, there is one factor that I believe contributed to the growth of our relationship – the fact that we were introduced by a mutual friend in an unassuming and casual environment. Having this similar circle of friends and acquaintances in addition to our mutually shared interests proved to be beneficial during the development of our relationship.

When it comes to long-term dating, I would argue that most of us prefer that “organic” feeling of meeting someone in person in a setting that doesn’t feel arranged or set-up. Although dating apps have made instantaneous communication with other gays alarmingly accessible and at our fingertips, these virtual environments don’t always cultivate the best opportunities for an engagement that’s longer lasting than a fun hookup. So, where then do we turn to meet other gays? How can we position ourselves in a way that makes us likely to meet other guys who align with our motivations, interests, and behaviors?

1. Join a Gay Sports League

Most major cities have them. Whether you are into dodgeball, volleyball, or generally enjoy any sport that involves balls near and around your face, there is likely a gay league that will meet your interest. These teams are obvious outlets for people to enjoy the sport or activity in question, but they also provide an excellent way for guys to meet others with shared interests. In West Hollywood, for example, the Gay Varsity Dodgeball League has taken on a seemingly cult-like following, with team members organizing regular nights out after matches, parties, and other fun stuff.

2. Volunteer at a Local LGBT Nonprofit

Many cities also offer guys the opportunity to get involved by volunteering at the local level with their LGBT community, which often proves to be a perfect way to meet other men with shared interests. For example, the Impulse Group has local chapters in cities all over the United States (and globally), offering active gay men a way to help promote sexual health and wellness by producing fun and informative events, organizing talks, and sometimes throwing parties. Groups like these often have their own retreats, get-togethers, and organize events that are perfect for meeting other friendly people.

3. Find Cool Meetup Events

Meetup is an app that allows users to organize their own events based on interest, hobby, sport, and more. Many of the existing groups have tons of members and weekly meetups, while others are smaller and meet less frequently. There are a ton of diverse LGBT-oriented groups on the platform – for example, this San Francisco LGBT Dungeons and Dragons group. Check it out – there might just be a group that fits your niche interest!

4. Attend Gay Pride Celebration Parties

This is definitely a more obvious option seeing as the chances of meeting other gay guys at pride events are rather high. That being said, the craziness and high-volume crowds that often accompany these events often deter people from attending, and these are valid concerns. Therefore, if you’re trying to avoid the mainstream madness of the actual parade or festival, seek out the private parties that often accompany a pride weekend in any given major city. For example, pride in Los Angeles often involved a daytime pool party at the Andaz in West Hollywood on pride Saturday. San Diego pride also offers a plethora of fun ticketed events as well, such as the vibrant Zoo Party.

5. Organize LGBTQ Heritage Month for Your Work Organization

If you are openly out at work, a great way to meet other queer men and women would be to organize an LGBTQ Heritage Month. LGBTQ Heritage Month (often called LGBTQ History Month) occurs every June to commemorate the Stonewall Riots that occurred in June, 1969. Some workplaces honor this month by sending out a weekly email blast that commemorates individuals who helped shape our community, culture, or fought for equal rights. For example, many workplaces choose to showcase individuals like Harvey Milk, Freddy Mercury, and even RuPaul! If your work currently doesn’t celebrate LGBTQ History Month (and they are open and accepting of LGBTQ people), you should consider organizing one yourself. You never know who from your workplace might volunteer to join you!

6. Attend an Event at a Gay Coffee Shop

Unlike heading to the bar and hoping to make an intimate connection with someone in the midst of drinking and debauchery, coffee shops cultivate the perfect atmosphere to have real conversations with people who are not intoxicated. Gay coffeeshops exist all over the country that cater to people from the LGBTQ community, such as Wicked Grounds in San Francisco, Equal Grounds in Rochester NY, and the infamous Starbucks in West Hollywood.

The post 6 Ways to Meet Gay Men that Don’t Require Apps appeared first on The Authentic Gay.

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Why did Philadelphia fans flocked to a gay bar call ‘Eagle?

Philadelphia fans flocked to a gay bar in Minneapolis because it has ‘Eagle’ in its name. But, it’s not that kind of Eagle.

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Retired professional football player – Fighting Homophobia

This Gay Former NFL Player Is Using His Privilege To Fight Homophobia “It was moments of heaven and then moments of hell,” Wade Davis said of his time as a closeted pro football player.

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Art Isn’t Easy

BY CHRISTOPHER BYRNE | Terrence McNally’s spellbinding new play “Fire and Air,” now at CSC, is ostensibly about the impresario Sergei Diaghilev, the fate of his Ballets Russes, and his artistic and sexual relationship with dancer Vaslav Nijinsky. As a chronicle of early 20th century art and a study of a complicated genius, it’s fascinating on […]

The post Art Isn’t Easy appeared first on Gay City News.

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2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang

All the LGBT angles for the Winter Olympics.

Outsports will be covering all of the LGBT angles of the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea. We have a record number of publicly out LGBTQ athletes participating in these Winter Games, so we’re hoping for some medals and big headlines!

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LGBT Inclusion Party at the Super Bowl draws NFL legends, hundreds of fans

Esera Tuaolo gathered NFL Legends, LGBT community members, and some incredible voices.

Esera Tuaolo’s inaugural Inclusion Party at the Super Bowl was a big hit in Minneapolis on Wednesday night, attracting hundreds of revelers expressing support for LGBT inclusion in football.

Tuaolo, a former NFL player who came out publicly as gay after he retired, wanted to create a tentpole event around the Super Bowl to continue the push for equality and inclusion in his beloved sport of football. Tuaolo called the Super Bowl in his adopted hometown of Minneapolis an “amazing opportunity” to demonstrate inclusion in the NFL.

Among the approximately 300 people in attendance Wednesday night were Minnesota Vikings legends Robert Smith and Carl Eller, Atlanta Falcons assistant general manager Scott Pioli, and openly gay sports writers Chris Hine and Steve Buckley. A number of athletes and coaches profiled by Outsports were also in attendance, including Justin Rabon, Brad Neumann and Lars Egge. Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey also took time out of his busy schedule to attend and say a few words.

The entertainment for the night, hosted at the Pourhouse in Downtown Minneapolis, was provided mostly by Tuaolo and his compatriots on last season’s The Voice. Wonderful singers like Natalie Stovall, Kristi Hoopes, Rebecca Brunner, Adam Cunningham, Keisha Renee, Mitchell Lee and Dennis Drummond joined Tuaolo on stage for some fantastic performances.

Proceeds from the event, in addition to successful silent and online auctions, went toward local Minnesota LGBT charities, including Hate Is Wrong, Pacer’s National Bullying Prevention Center and Avenues For Homeless Youth.

With the Super Bowl in Atlanta next year, Tuaolo will continue his Inclusion Party. He played defensive end for both the Vikings and Falcons during his NFL career.

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These Patriots offensive linemen say they’d support a gay teammate

Acceptance would await someone like Ryan O’Callaghan coming out today, players say.

MINNEAPOLIS — When Ryan O’Callaghan played offensive lineman for the New England Patriots in 2006 and 2007, he was deeply closeted and a decade from coming out publicly as gay. The Patriots, with their emphasis on winning and attention to details, were a great fit for someone trying to blend in and not have undue focus on his personal life.

“All you are there to do is whatever it takes to win,” O’Callaghan told Outsports of his time in New England, which included a Super Bowl trip to end the 2007 season. “Distractions were not allowed. Everyone on the team had a job, knew their job and really focused on doing that. As little comfort as it did bring, it did help.”

While society has made great strides in LGBT acceptance in the time since O’Callaghan played for the Patriots — including legalizing same-sex marriage — the NFL and major men’s pro sports remain a desert, bereft of out gay or bisexual athletes.

Since there has never been an active out NFL player (and only 11 who came out after retiring), straight allies in the locker room remain a crucial element should any player decide to take the plunge.

With that in mind, I asked seven current Patriots linemen — starters, subs and practice squad players — whether a Ryan O’Callaghan coming out in 2018 would be accepted. Their answers were a collective yes, such a player would be welcome. This was echoed by Patriots owner Robert Kraft who told me here in Minneapolis that “the only thing I care about is can they help us win.”

The most tepid response came from center David Andrews, who said, “Whatever people decide to do in their personal life, that’s their choice.” When I followed up, he sounded like a mini-Bill Belichick: ”I’m really focused on Philly. That’s a bridge we’ll cross when we get there. For me, I’m just focused on Philly.”

To be fair to Andrews, I did talk with him during a media scrum, where it’s hard to do follow-ups and have any depth. The other six I spoke with were in short one-on-ones, where they felt comfortable being a little more expansive.

It was clear that LGBT issues were not at the forefront for these players and I’m not sure any of them had heard of O’Callaghan’s coming out. When I asked rookie guard Cole Croston whether he had gay friends or acquaintances growing up, he said “it really wasn’t a part of my life as a kid.” That’s not surprising from someone raised in Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, population 4,227.

Yet Croston was clear that he would embrace an openly gay teammate. Only one of the players I spoke with, Ted Karras, had a teammate in high school or college he later found out was gay. “He was always a good teammate and it didn’t change anything for me,” Karras said.

The views of all the linemen I spoke with were pretty clear — for them, a gay teammate would be just one of the guys. Here is what they said.

Cameron Fleming, tackle, 4th year

”I don’t think it would be an issue for me. It’s a workplace like everywhere else. It definitely is a little bit different but I’d be fine with it and accept it.”

LaAdrian Waddle, tackle, 5th year

”I don’t think you’d know about [acceptance] until it happened. Different people have different opinions. I wouldn’t care. It wouldn’t matter to me.”

Joe Thuney, guard, 2nd year

”Everyone just wants to work for a common goal. Everyone wants to win and we want whoever can contribute to a winning effort. We just want to win. What can you do to help the team win that’s the bottom line.”

Ted Karras, guard, 2nd year

”I can only speak for myself and I think where we are in our society I think that would be absolutely OK. I would totally accept a teammate regardless of [his sexual orientation].”

David Andrews, center, 3rd year

“Whatever people decide to do in their personal life, that’s their choice.”

Cole Croston, guard, rookie

”I would absolutely not have a problem. I think he’d be accepted for sure. We’re in the year 2018 where that kind of thing is happening all over the place so I don’t think it’d be an issue. He’s just another guy on the team.”

James Ferentz, center, practice squad, 3rd year

”I think we’ve been ready for it. I think we live in a world where we’re more focused on playing football vs. what you do in your spare time. We’re more worried if he’s a good teammate and football player, that’s the biggest thing.”

”I’m sure along the way [I’ve had a gay teammate]. I’ve been playing football for 12 years now, I’m sure somewhere along the way someone was. Does it even matter?”

”My understanding is it’s not a choice, you’re born a certain way. For anyone to have to hide what you are is wrong in my opinion and I’d like to think I play in a league where we’re openly accepting of anybody. We’re more worried about you as a teammate and a football player, that’s really what’s important.”

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Chris Evert wants to keep Margaret Court’s name on tennis arena

Evert says Court’s tennis accomplishments should be honored.

Tennis great Chris Evert has weighed in on the Margaret Court Arena controversy, and she’s siding with the tennis legend.

Evert said in a recent interview with the New York Daily News that the arena should continue to bear the name of the Australian tennis great, despite her public statements about LGBT people.

“There’s a controversy — should they take (Court’s) name off the (Margaret Court Arena)? No. You’re celebrating her tennis.”

Evert said that Court’s name is on the arena because of her tennis accomplishments, and her name should stay on the arena because of that. Court won more career singes and doubles Grand Slam titles — 64 — than any other man or woman in history. It’s a record that will likely never be broken. Evert won 18 Grand Slam singles titles, tied with Martina Navratilova for fifth most by a woman, and she has the record for most Grand Slam singles appearances by a woman, 34.

Evert’s position was the position of her friend Billie Jean King until only recently. Despite Court saying some pretty mean things about Navratilova being a lesbian and being on the record opposing marriage equality, Court continued to get King’s support. It’s only been with a heightening of messaging by Court — likening the LGBT community and its members to “Hitler” and “the devil” — that King finally had enough and has called for the renaming of the arena.

To be clear, Evert said that Court’s statements don’t sit well with her.

“Her philosophy bothers me, yes,” she told the Daily News.

With so few female athletes recognized with arenas named after them and regarded as highly as Court is in the tennis world, it’s understandable why someone like Evert would be really cautious about removing a woman’s name. No doubt it’s one of the reasons King came to her current position more slowly than others.

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